Yurtseven helps NC State top Penn State, 85-78

Omer Yurtseven (14) dunks during the game. NC State defeated Penn State, by a score of 85-78, at PNC Arena in Raleigh, North Carolina on November 29, 2017 at (Jerome Carpenter/WRAL Contributor)

RALEIGH, N.C. — North Carolina State built its big lead with sharp shooting from behind the 3-point line — then made it stand by shooting well from the free-throw line.

N.C. State held on to beat Penn State 85-78 on Wednesday night in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge.

Final12TPenn St.304878NCSU374885Boxscore | Recap LeadersPenn St.NCSUPointsT. Carr 29O. Yurtseven 19ReboundsM. Watkins 14T. Dorn 12AssistsJ. Reaves 53 tied with 3

Omer Yurtseven had 19 points and 11 rebounds, Al Freeman scored 17 points and fellow graduate transfer Sam Hunt added a season-best 14 and hit four of the Wolfpack’s season-high 10 3-pointers.

N.C. State (6-2) hit 8 of 10 free throws in the final minute to snap the two-game losing streak that followed its upset of then-No. 2 Arizona last week in the Bahamas.

Coach Kevin "Keatts said we had the flu, and this game was our recovery," Yurtseven said, "and now, we’re back healthy."

Lennard Freeman finished with 10 points and Torin Dorn added 12 rebounds for the Wolfpack.

Tony Carr scored 29 points on 12-of-25 shooting for Penn State while Lamar Stevens finished with 13 points and Shep Garner added 10.

In losing for the second time in three games, the Nittany Lions (6-2) — who usually thrive on generating steals — instead had 18 turnovers, including two in the final minute.

And while they outscored N.C. State 42-26 in the paint and held a 43-35 rebounding advantage, coach Patrick Chambers said his team missed too many short-range shots and gave up too many rebounds at the wrong times.

"I love the fight that this team has," Chambers said. "They came back, cut it to three. … We need stops. And we need to cover the glass. I thought they got some timely rebounds."

The Wolfpack never trailed in the second half and led by 13 with just over four minutes to play before Penn State rallied, closing to 79-76 on Lamar Stevens’ stickback with 43.1 seconds remaining.

After Markell Johnson hit a free throw with 41.4 seconds left, the Nittany Lions threw the ball away on their next trip downcourt.

Braxton Beverly hit two free throws with 30.9 seconds left to stretch it to 82-76, and after Carr hit a jumper, Johnson added two more to make it a six-point game. Carr was called for an offensive foul with about 10 seconds left and Beverly iced it with a free throw with 4.7 seconds left.

BIG PICTURE

Penn State: The Nittany Lions lost their first true road game of the season. Carr continued his scoring tear, but Penn State couldn’t get much from another of its key scorers. Mike Watkins, a 10.3-point scorer, finished with eight on 4-of-10 shooting, but did have 14 rebounds.

N.C. State: The Wolfpack took care of some of the hallmarks of first-year coach Kevin Keatts’ uptempo system — shooting 3s and forcing turnovers. They have forced an average of 22.4 takeaways in their five home games, and even Yurtseven got into the 3-point-shooting act, knocking down three of them. "The thing is, if you treat every practice like games, then games are going to be just like practices," Yurtseven said. "That’s basically the logic behind it, and whatever you do, it pays off at the end."

INJURY REPORT

The Wolfpack were down two players after forwards Darius Hicks and Abdul-Malik Abu suffered knee injuries. Abu, who missed the first four games with a sprained right knee, reported knee soreness and was held out. Hicks, who didn’t play in any of the three games in the Bahamas, tore his right anterior cruciate ligament in practice earlier this week and will miss the season. Keatts said

KEY STATS

N.C. State’s bench outscored Penn State’s 39-9. The bulk of that was provided by Yurtseven and Hunt, as N.C. State went only three deep on the bench.

UP NEXT

Penn State: Begins Big Ten play on Saturday at Iowa.

N.C. State: Plays host to South Carolina State on Saturday.

___

More college basketball: http://collegebasketball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

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The Benefits of Local SEO in Raleigh NC

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These are the benefits of local SEO in Raleigh NC. Use the best search engine strategies if you want to enjoy the benefits mentioned in this article. Do not rely on SEO strategy.

TA was in! Gio’s gone! Unforgettable moments define NC State-UNC rivalry

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Raleigh, N.C. — Rivalry week is here for NC State, and Dave Doeren summed it up best on Monday in his press conference.

“You look at records in these games and they don’t matter,” Doeren said. “It’s always going to be an emotional game where both teams are playing for a lot.”

This series has proven without a doubt that the records – and who is favored – don’t matter. No one knows what will happen in a rivalry game as emotional as State-Carolina.

Last season, North Carolina was favored by 10 points with the Wolfpack limping into the contest in Chapel Hill and on the brink of missing a bowl. What happened? NC State jumped out to a 21-0 lead early in the second quarter, closing out the deal 28-21 in a huge victory for Doeren.

“It’s about these players and these coaches hanging together amid a lot of heartbreaking days and negativity and doubt,” Doeren said after the win. “Guys just kept fighting with each other and for each other and they knew where our program is headed. Today was about mastering ourselves and finding a way to win and doing it against our rival.”

• Inside the Rivalry: NCSU vs. UNC Football

Doeren’s first win in the series came in 2014 when the Wolfpack defeated North Carolina 35-7, this time as a seven-point underdog, with the shutout ending on a meaningless touchdown in the final two minutes.

The Wolfpack rushed for a staggering 388 yards and starting quarterback Jacoby Brissett, who accounted for 167 of those rushing yards, only had to attempt 11 passes in the blowout win. That performance led to Doeren’s memorable remarks on the culture within his football program.

“This is a blue-collar school… a work ethic, hands in the dirt school,” said Doeren. “It was founded by tough people. That is what this football team will be.”

As with rivalries, they all certainly haven’t gone the Wolfpack’s way. North Carolina has won the last two games played in Carter-Finley Stadium, including a 45-34 rout in 2015 when the Tar Heels jumped out to a 35-7 advantage on their way to winning the Coastal Division championship.

We can go on and on, but what makes this rivalry really special isn’t the unexpected outcomes. It is the memorable moments.

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Wolfpack, Heels going in different directions after bye weeks

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The first NC State-North Carolina game I covered as a media member was in 2004 in Chapel Hill. NC State marched up and down the field, totaling 577 yards of offense to just 356 for the Tar Heels, but lost the turnover battle 3-0.

The Wolfpack lost 30-24, and ultimately, it was the one yard T.A. McLendon didn’t get that proved to be the difference that night.

For North Carolina fans, that goal line stand ranks right up there with the Gio Bernard punt return for a touchdown in 2012. NC State fans will never forget the Russell Wilson “Hail Mary” in 2010 or freshman gunslinger Philip Rivers catching a touchdown pass in the 38-20 rout in Chapel Hill in 2000.

This season NC State is favored by 17.5 points, easily the largest spread in recent memory. However, the road team has won the last four matchups which should give the Tar Heels, who are riding a two-game winning streak despite being 3-8 overall, added confidence.

Doeren reiterated his thoughts on the rivalry when asked about North Carolina’s struggles this season.

“I don’t really think it matters what their record is in this game. “I know it didn’t for us last year when we played them.”

No one knows what is going to happen on Saturday, but it certainly will be memorable.

James Henderson is the editor of InsidePackSports.com, which covers NC State athletics. You can follow James on Twitter for more coverage of the Wolfpack.

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Raleigh teen sued NC once over climate change. Undeterred, she’s back.

Hallie Turner was 13 years old when she stood outside a Wake County courtroom telling media crews with cameras trained on her that she planned to continue to fight for action on climate change despite her unsuccessful attempt to sue North Carolina over its environmental rules.

Now 15, Hallie is trying again to get the state Department of Environmental Quality and the state Environmental Management Commission to adopt a rule calling for a sharp reduction in emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases over the next three decades. This time, two other North Carolina teens — Emily Liu, 16, of Chapel Hill, and Arya Pontula, a Raleigh 17-year-old, will join Hallie in petitioning the commission.

With the help of Ryke Longest at the Duke Environmental Law and Policy Clinic, and Our Children’s Trust, a Oregon-based nonprofit focused on climate change, the teens hope to persuade the state to adopt a rule ensuring that by 2050 carbon dioxide emissions would be down to zero.

“It would be a future in which you would not be burning fossil fuels to power your homes,” Longest said on Monday, the day before the teens plan to file their petition.

Not just a passing fancy

Hallie, an Enloe High School student, became interested in reducing greenhouse gases when she was only 9 years old. At the time, she had heard people talk about “climate change” and talked with her parents over a couple of dinner conversations about the meaning of the phrase.

After that, she went to the library and picked up Al Gore’s book “An Inconvenient Truth.”

The book, she said, intrigued and inspired her. Though she wasn’t certain she understood at the time all of what the former vice president had written, she took steps that she could to reduce her own carbon footprint. She rides her bike and the family has solar panels on their house.

In the ensuing years, Hallie worked on the leadership council of Kids vs. Global Warming, a campaign that started in Canada. She has attended rallies and marches in the Triangle and in Washington, D.C. She spoke at the Climate Convergence on Raleigh in 2013 and tries to engage her classmates in discussions.

Hallie and her co-petitioners argue that North Carolina’s state Environmental Commission, 15 members appointed by the governor and state legislators, are obligated under the state Constitution “to protect our natural resources.”

“The reason we’re continuing this,” Hallie said of the petition being filed on Tuesday, “is because this issue hasn’t gotten better. It’s getting worse. …With our president unwilling to sign the Paris Climate Agreement, all the action that’s going to take place is really going to be at the state and local level.”

Concerted national effort

The North Carolina teens’ petition comes as children across the country are turning to the courts in attempts to compel action on climate change.

Groups of children have sued states and the Trump administration using various legal theories to try to force the reduction of pollution in the air and water. One lawsuit filed by 21 young Americans — Juliana vs. The U.S. — contends the federal government is violating their Fifth Amendment rights, depriving them of life, liberty, or property without due process of law. The lawyers have argued the government knew about the dangerous effects of burning fossil fuels and has put its citizens at risk by allowing companies to drill for oil on public lands and mine coal.

Hallie first petitioned the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission when she was 12.

Related stories from Raleigh News & Observer

Wake judge rules against teen facing off against NC on climate change

But the commissioners never got to the crux of her request, which included scientific data and more to support her theory for why the state should curb greenhouse gas emissions. A commissioner rejected Hallie’s petition because he said it was incomplete. He also added that North Carolina law prohibited environmental agencies from enacting state laws stricter than federal law.

Hallie challenged the decision and took North Carolina to court.

Mike Morgan, a state Supreme Court justice who presided over the 2015 hearing when he was a Wake County Superior Court judge, ruled against Hallie but not before commending her for taking a stand.

“Regardless of what the decision is, this court has a great amount of admiration for Hallie Turner and her maturity as a young adult to be involved in a process to try to make a difference in the world,” Morgan said from the bench before issuing his ruling.

More science this time

Not everyone was so complimentary of her action, though.

After numerous media outlets shared news about the teen’s attempt to get North Carolina to change its rules, her parents, Mark and Kelly Turner, were amazed by some of the negative comments posted on the sites. Commenters who challenged the idea of global warming accused the adults supporting Hallie of exploitation. Some directed derogatory comments at the teen, too.

Plucky, poised and wise beyond her years, Hallie brushes off the negative messages.

“There’s no merit to those arguments,” she said on Monday. “The science is on our side.”

Kelly Turner said as a parent, “you always worry about anything negative being said to or against your child. I think she has a good head on her shoulders. I’m proud of her.”

Hallie said she hopes the petition put together over much of the past year will be met with a different result than her last one. Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat, has voiced his support for the Paris Climate Agreement, highlighting a difference from two years ago when a Republican was North Carolina’s governor and Democrat Barack Obama was president.

Hallie also is glad to have other teens with her.

Liu’s passion for environmental science developed through her participation in UNC’s Climate Leadership and Energy Awareness program and the Alliance for Climate Education’s Action Fellowship program.

"I was exposed to not only the science aspects of the environmental movement but also the climate justice side," Liu said during a break in her swim practice on Monday evening. "Given the impact of the current political climate on the movement, I feel that the time to act is now."

Pontula also became involved with climate change activism while at the Alliance for Climate Education program. As Hallie has, both girls have spoken at city council meetings and elsewhere advocating for similar goals.

They hope the state’s environmental commissioners will incorporate suggestions from their petition into the state’s rules.

“We have a lot more detailed science incorporated into it,” Hallie said.

Anne Blythe: 919-836-4948, @AnneBlythe1

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UNC Asheville Gets Verbal Commitment From Raleigh’s Hannah Bruno

Photo Courtesy: Hannah Bruno (Twitter)

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NEW COMMIT: Hannah Bruno, of the Marlins of Raleigh, has given her verbal commitment to swim for the University of North Carolina Asheville beginning next fall. Bruno is a senior at Leesville Road High school in Raleigh.

Bruno’s top times include:

100 Fly 58.85 50 Free 24.77 100 Free 53.78 200 Free 1:58.66 200 IM 2:14.59

Former Marlin Catherine Allen will be a junior when Bruno arrives in the mountains next fall. Allen had a stellar freshman year, making a smooth transition to college swimming in which she set Asheville freshman records in the 100 (57.14) and 200 (2:04.12) butterflies. Bruno’s best 100 fly time would rank her fourth on Asheville’s All Time Top Performers list. She’d also fall fifth on the Bulldogs’ 100 freestyle list and be tied for tenth in the 50 free.

Bruno wrote in her announcement made on Twitter,

“I am beyond excited to announce my verbal commitment to swim for UNC-A! Thanks to everybody who helped me get here! Go bulldogs!”

High school and club teammate Grace Countie is also verbally committed to continue swimming in state next year, sending her verbal commitment to the Tar Heels.

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